Snowshoe and Brahma Flymph Emerger

Snowshoe and Brahma Flymph Emerger

Hook: Tiemco TMC100BL #12-14
Body: Snowshoe Hare dyed olive
Hackle: Brahma hen dyed golden olive
Thread: Danville 6/0 brown olive

A pattern drawing on classic wet flies such as the Woodcock and Hare’s lug but tied with materials to give it greater buoyancy so that it will sit in the surface film. Vernon S. “Pete” Hidy who coined the term flymph described them as patterns to imitate the hatching insect be it mayfly, caddisfly, or midge, that is in the stage of metamorphosis as it emerges. Suspect this pattern may need some ribbing to give it greater robustness when fished.

Denson’s General Purpose Daddy

Denson's General Purpose Daddy

Hook: Tiemco TMC100BL #10
Rib: Gold wire
Body: Blend of Natural Hare/Squirrel 50/50 mix with pearl ice dub
Body hackle: Grizzly hen dyed golden olive
Wings: Cree Cock
Legs: Knotted pheasant tail
Shoulder hackle: Grizzly hen dyed golden olive
Thread: Danville 6/0 brown olive

A straight copy of Rob Denson’s pattern, though my choice of materials and orientation of the fly in the photograph certainly seems to accentuate the olive colouring more than in Rob Denson’s original. I really like the simplicity of this Daddy pattern, there have been some truly wonderful and complex patterns published over the years for a fly that is a staple for the tail end of the season. With plenty of bulk there’s lots of material to keep it afloat or it would be relatively easy to sink into the surface film.

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Claret and Gold UV Hobbler

Claret and Gold UV Hobbler

Hook: Hayabusa 761 #12
Tail: Pheasant tail fibres, dyed claret
Body: Claret/Gold UV straggler fritz
Legs: Knotted Pheasant tail
Cloak: Bronze Mallard, dyed claret
Thread: Danville 6/0 claret

A simple variation of the black and silver UV hobbler from George Barron’s book [1] At the end of the line. As George notes, the extra dressing on hobblers seems to appeal more to rainbows than wild browns so this variant seems a sensible addition to my Eyebrook box. Tied up a few for this season with different lengths of cloak, this is longer in the Irish tradition for dabblers. Best described as a modern traditional, the legginess of hobblers should make it a particularly effective pattern.

  1. George Barron At the end of the line (Talybont, Ceredigion: Privately published by the author, 2016).